Military Saves Blog

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Tips, advice, and the latest news from the savings world.

Tools You'll Want to Use from the TSP

TSP Thrift Savings Plan
Written by Super User · 13 December 2012

December 13, 2012
by Miriam Darden Settles, CFP®
Federal Retirement Thrift Investment Board


With its rollout of the Roth option this year, the Thrift Savings Plan (TSP) created educational materials (both printed and online) to help you understand how Roth works and determine if it’s the right choice for you. 

New online calculator

We have a new calculator on our website:  The Contribution Comparison Calculator.  It allows you to compare the effects—on your paycheck today and your TSP balance in the future—of making Roth contributions vs. traditional contributions.  If you’re thinking about Roth, we encourage you to try it out.  Visit the Planning & Tools tab on our website, www.tsp.gov.

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Personal Loans 101: Understanding APR

Debt Credit Loans
Written by Super User · 12 December 2012

The following post comes from the America Saves Blog. Follow them on Twitter and Facebook.

December 12, 2012
By Nadjha Johnson, America Saves Intern

The nature of traditional installment loans can be complicated and misleading. Luckily, The American Financial Services Association Education Foundation (AFSAEF) has created a financial literacy initiative called Personal Loans 101. Personal Loans 101 educates potential borrowers, policymakers, and other interested parties on the framework of installment loans.

In today’s world, almost everyone needs access to credit. Whether it is to make a small purchase, pay for an unexpected emergency, repair the car or obtain a mortgage on your first home, everyone must have access to affordable credit.

But how do you choose the best loan to fit your individual circumstances? If you are like most Americans, you want a loan that is relatively easy to obtain and understand. You do not want to go through a lengthy, complicated and confusing process to determine what loan or credit product best meets your needs. You want an easy way to compare them. The latest brochure from AFSAEF: Understanding APR defines Annual Percentage Rate (APR) and explains how to calculate the true value of loans. The brochure includes:

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The CFPB's Office of Servicemember Affairs: an Important Resource for Military Families

Consumer Protection
Written by Super User · 11 December 2012

December 11, 2012
By Lila Quintiliani, AFC®
Military Saves Assistant Coordinator,
Communication and Outreach

Not all servicemembers and their families realize it, but there is a government institution watching their back on financial matters.  It’s the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) and its Office of Servicemember Affairs (OSA), whose mission is to educate and empower military families to make better-informed decisions on financial products and services.  But they don’t just disseminate information – they also collect consumer complaints, actively monitor them, and coordinate with state and federal agencies to help strengthen consumer protection laws that safeguard the military community.  In just over a year, they have already handled over 3,000 military complaints.

While the CFPB is not the only place that takes complaints from servicemembers (others include the Better Business Bureau Military Line, the Federal Trade Commission, and the Internet Crime Complaint Center), its ability to work with a variety of agencies (including the Department of Defense, Department of Veterans Affairs, Department of Justice, and state attorneys-general) to pinpoint military consumer law violations, issue industry guidance, and bring enforcement actions puts it in a unique position to help military families through a wide range of tools.

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Have No Money to Spare? How You Can Build a Rainy Day Fund!

Emergency Fund Emergency Savings Budgeting Savings Tips
Written by Super User · 06 December 2012

Have No Money to Spare? How You Can Build a Rainy Day Fund!

December 6th 2012
By Mikki Venekamp, AFC®
Personal Financial Counselor

Most financial experts recommend that people should set aside $500-$1000 as their emergency fund (aka rainy day fund). Most of us don’t even have enough money to make ends meet, so how can we squeeze any more money out for a rainy day fund? I used to feel this way, but my husband and I worked hard and completed the mission of fully funding our rainy day fund. Now I would like to share our workable solution with you.

Save for Emergencies

First, you need to create a “Money Map” (aka budget) for yourself or your family. You will need to know your monthly income (take home pay) and monthly expenditures (bills). Then you use your income minus your expenses and hope you will get a positive number as the bottom-line. What happens if the bottom-line number is in the red? Don’t panic! Look and see where you can trim expenses to bring the number to zero instead of a negative number.

To trim your budget, cut unnecessary spending such as a cup of Joe in the morning, energy drinks in the afternoon, and going out for lunch. If cutting spending still does not push the number to the zero mark, then you probably need to find extra income like a part-time job. I know… I understand…you probably think I am crazy suggesting getting another job. I got it. You have been working all day, and yes, I just asked you to take on another part-time job. Let’s think about this: if you can’t cut your spending, then you have no choice but to increase your income. Having a part-time job is a temporary thing, not a long term situation unless you want it to be.

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Planning for Holiday Spending

Budgeting Holiday Saving
Written by Super User · 05 December 2012

Planning for Holiday Spending

December 5, 2012
By John Stephan, Union Bank N.A.
Senior Vice President and Pacific Northwest Regional Executive

The holidays are upon us, and many people often feel pressure during this time of year to spend money beyond their means.

Having a plan in place may help you enjoy the festivities of the season without the worry of a post-holiday spending hangover. Following are some tips for developing a holiday budget.

Commit it to Paper

Make a list of items you normally spend money on this time of year, and don’t forget to include things like postage for cards, extra contributions you may make to charitable organizations, holiday meals, entertainment, and other items.  It might be helpful to look through last year’s bank or credit card statements to get an idea of how much you spent on items the previous year.  Make a list of all items, and the family and friends who will receive your gifts and assign a maximum amount to spend for each. Bring the list and budget with you when shopping and stick to your plan.

Start Saving Now

Remember that anything you finance can cost you more in the long run, so try to pay cash when possible to avoid post-holiday debt. Set up an automatic transfer or have part of your paycheck deposited into a targeted savings account that is solely for holiday spending.  If you are unable to set aside part of your income toward this goal, look for ways to cut back on your regular spending or decrease your holiday budget.  Consider eliminating one or two bills, such as cable TV or an unused gym membership, to help free up funds to put toward your budget.

Consider ways to earn additional cash, such as a part-time, seasonal job, or by selling homemade goods and craft items at a holiday boutique or fair. Taking on additional work here or there might help pay for some or all of the items on your holiday list.

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Tip of the Day

  • Written by Guest Blogger | March 26, 2014

    Need #savings tips? Check out these 54 savings tips & boost the amount of #money you can #save http://ow.ly/sfsPP

Saver Stories View all »

Setting a Goal Leads to Success

Written by Super User | May 24, 2019

Growing up, Marisa’s dad had always talked about saving first, but she said she didn’t really internalize it until much later. “I was drifting along with no plan, carrying a little bit of revolving debt, saving some money here and there, but without a real plan for it.”

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Building a Six-Figure Savings While Enjoying Life

Written by Jackie Toops | November 13, 2020

Does the idea of saving up hundreds of thousands of dollars seem impossible? How about doing it while still living an enjoyable lifestyle?

For military spouse Martina and her husband, an E-5 in the Navy, accumulating a six-figure savings has become a reality. One might think that in order to save this much, it would take a great deal of sacrificing and forgoing a certain quality of life, but Martina and her husband would disagree. “Over the past few years (about five), we've managed to save almost $120,000 while mostly living on one income. We've learned so much about easy ways to save money and live a good life,” shares Martina.

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When You Start Small, Saving is Easy

Written by Lila Quintiliani | August 12, 2019

When Attiyya first got married, she and her Marine husband had just graduated from college and were focused on paying off student loan debt. They had both attended private schools and had sizeable loans. Then three months after the wedding, the couple found out they were pregnant with their first child.

The first year of their marriage, says Attiyya, was a balancing act between paying down debt and saving for the future.

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