Top Five Tax Breaks to Ease the Burden for Military Members

By Alecia D. Blair, Military Saves Communications Associate

For military servicemembers and their families, tax time can be an especially stressful time. With permanent change of station (PCS) moves, deployments and all the changes those life events involve, it’s easy for service members to miss some great tax perks. Here is a list of the top five tax breaks (in my opinion) to help you maximize your tax return and breathe a little easier this tax season.

5. FREE Tax Assistance

Consider using your installation’s free tax filing service, especially if your tax return is pretty straightforward. Another option is to use the free Military OneSource online tax filing service, available to eligible servicemembers.

4. Don’t Forget to Deduct Expenses
Don’t forget to know and claim your military-related deductions! According to Ethan Ewing, Military.com, any permanent change of station (PCS), travel, transportation and education expenses left unreimbursed by the military may be deducted. Many of these deductions also apply to National Guard & Reserves, (thanks to USAA via Military.com), so keep all receipts handy and organized.

3. There’s an Exception for That
Take advantage of every tax time exception available to servicemembers and their spouses. Military.com (courtesy of USAA) offers a list of these exceptions. Here are a few:

  • Are you returning from a deployment to a combat zone and concerned about the looming tax deadline? Rest assured, time is on your side. You can apply for extensions for tax filing, paying taxes, claiming refunds and even contributing to your IRA.
  • Military spouses! Did you know that under the Military Spouses Residency Relief Act, you can choose the previous state you lived in for tax filing purposes? If your previous state had lower or no income tax that could mean more savings for you.
  • And if you are currently deployed or on temporary duty (TDY), your spouse can submit your joint tax returns using a power of attorney, rather than waiting for you to sign.

2. Earned Income Tax Credit

Don’t overlook the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC), “a refundable federal income tax credit for low- and moderate-income working individuals, couples and families,” according to Laura Roler, Military Saves. If you qualify for this tax credit, the money you receive from it may be used to kick start an emergency fund! Determine your eligibility and learn more about EITC today.

1. Tax Exempt Income
Did you serve in a combat zone during 2014? If so, your income may be tax exempt, according to Ethan Ewing, Military.com. That exemption may also apply to reenlistment bonuses and other types of income earned in a combat zone. For all the details, you can also visit the IRS tax information for members of the military.

Use these tax tips to make tax time less stressful, maximize you return and save money. And don’t forget, once you’ve received your refund, prepare for military life’s surprises with your tax return.

Set a goal. Make a plan. Save automatically.

Other Resources
http://www.consumerfinance.gov/blog/category/taxes/
http://www.militarysaves.org/blog/1095-healthy-uses-for-your-2014-tax-refund
http://www.military.com/money/personal-finance/taxes

Tip of the Day

  • Written by Guest Blogger | March 13, 2014

    Start an emergency fund by saving $10/week or $40/month to save $500 by the end of the year http://ow.ly/rswS2

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