Job Interrupted: A To-Do List for Tough Times

Originally published by FINRA

Many of us can identify with the plight of the furloughed federal worker. That's because we have experienced economically stressful times at one or more points in our working life—and may again.

At its most disruptive, your job is lost—and so is your income. Less extreme, but anxiety-laden all the same, is when hours are cut, salary reduced, business opportunities curtailed or paychecks withheld. The situation is the same in all cases: You must live with less.

Here is a short to-do list to get you through situations in which employment is interrupted and income curtailed.

1. Take control of your finances. Quickly design a revised budget and track spending closely. Cut where you can—as quickly as you can. This will help avoid falling behind on bills or buying on credit. Your employer, union (if you belong to one) and local public job center may offer guidance and advice related to budgeting and bill paying. Start here to remake your budget: How to Create a Budget and Stick to It in 7 Steps.

2. Manage bills and debt wisely. Even with responsible budgeting, costs can exceed expenses. When it comes to paying your bills, if you think you will be late with a payment, contact those you owe to discuss your situation. It may be possible to work out terms that offer you financial flexibility, whether it's an extension on when the rent or mortgage is due or waiving a late charge. Be sure you clearly understand what you are committing to—and get the terms in writing.

3. Borrow with care. Tough times can sometimes result in costly borrowing decisions. Understand the risks and costs of taking a withdrawal or borrowing against your 401(k). Avoid payday loans and other high-cost forms of borrowing. How? By first talking with banks and credit unions: explain your situation and get their best loan offers first. Another option is to turn to friends or family. It's often best to keep this loan a business transaction: come to the family table with an amount you need, what the money is for and a payback plan.

4. Find out quickly if you qualify for unemployment insurance (UI) benefits. Each state operates its own unemployment insurance program. Click here to find your state's benefits. Many states require you to file for unemployment benefits online and some provide toll-free numbers or other ways to obtain assistance in filing. Also, take advantage of your state's employment services. To find your state workforce agency use this helpful map, which also includes employment opportunities and other resources.

5. Protect yourself from financial fraud and job-search scams. There have already been news reports of fraudsters trying to bilk federal employees hobbled by the prolonged government shutdown, enticing them with free loan offers or phony job search ads. Both types of scams often seek to gain access to personal or financial information. Financial duress can also make you more vulnerable to financial fraud and a fraudster's promises of quick or risk-free riches. Be extremely wary of cold-call investment pitches. Use FINRA's Scam Meter to check if a financial pitch carries some of the warning signs of fraud.

 

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